The History Press has just published a new revised edition of Mike Dickerman's bestselling anthology, Mountain Washington: Narratives and Perspectives. Over the next two months, Mike will be making a mini-book tour across New Hampshire, visiting many retail outlets to talk about this new book. Here's a quick listing of some of the tour dates and stops:

Aug. 5: Littleton Food Cooperative, LocalFest, Noon to 2 p.m.

Aug. 10: Fadden's General Store, North Woodstock, time TBA

Aug. 22: River Run Bookstore, Portsmouth, 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 26: New Hampshire Permaculture Day, Warner, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Sept. 6: Littleton (NH) Public Library Author Series, 6:30 p.m.





August 15, 2016



Life of legendary New Hampshire

lumberman James Everell Henry

is told in newly published family history
 

     Over the years much has been written about James Everell Hhenry, the well-known New Hampshire lumberman who remains one of the most controversial and colorful individuals in White Mountain annals. His rise from a simple country boy to the so-called “lumber king” of the Granite State has been well documented by logging historians such as Bill Gove, Fran Belcher, and Robert Pike. But a lesser known, privately published biography of Henry has received much less attention over years. “So it is with great pleasure that we have just published in book form this important family history,” said Mike Dickerman, owner and founder of Littleton, N.H.--based Bondcliff Books.

   Titled “The Life of James Everell Henry” and written by the lumberman’s namesake grandson, James E. Henry II, this account of the legendary Granite State timber baron, originally written and published in 1962, offers many insights into Mr. Henry’s remarkable life, which includes his transformation (in the late 1800s) of the town of Lincoln, N.H. from a wilderness outpost to a thriving mill town.  

   Mr. Henry’s life story is supplemented in this new edition by an extended appendix featuring nearly a dozen period pieces offering more insight into not only his life, but also the working lives of his three sons, and of his hired men, who toiled for decades in the woods of the Zealand and Pemigewasset River valleys of the White Mountains. These include newspaper and magazine articles written during Henry’s days as New Hampshire’s pre-eminent lumber baron.  “These additional pieces really complement the life history of Mr. Henry, who is truly one of the most colorful and controversial figures in White Mountain annals,” added Dickerman, who compiled the appendix to the book.

   According to the publisher, a portion of the proceeds from the sale of each copy of the book will be donated to the Upper Pemigewasset Historical Society of Lincoln, N.H. This is through an agreement between Bondcliff Books and descendants of the Henry family, including the author’s daughter. Dickerman also notes that the original title of the author’s work was “An Account of the Life of James Everell Henry I and of His Town of Lincoln, New Hampshire,” but it has been shortened for this new edition.

   Bondcliff Books is an independent book publisher specializing in titles related to New Hampshire, the White Mountains and northern New England. Since its founding in 1996, the Littleton company has published several dozen books, including hiking guides and books on White Mountain logging and railroading history.

   The Life of James Everell Henry is now available in retail stores across the region. Copies may also be purchased directly from the publisher by visiting Bondcliff Books’ website (www.bondcliffbooks.com), by calling 603-444-4880, or by writing to the publisher at P.O. Box 385, Littleton, NH 03561


March 1, 2015

New book tells logging history of the 
remote
Moose River valley in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom

 

   A newly published book authored by longtime Vermont logging and railroad historian Bill Gove chronicles the rich logging history of one the Northeast Kingdom’s most scenic and remote regions.

   In Logging Along the Moose River: The Story of the Victory Branch Railroad, which was published this month by Bondcliff Books of Littleton, New Hampshire, Gove takes readers back to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when timber was king in the remote communities of Victory and Granby, Vermont. Through words and with the aid of close to one hundred photographs, illustrations and original maps, Gove offers up a one-of-a-kind history that touches on not just the logging operations in the immediate vicinity of the Moose River, but also the workings of the former Victory Branch Railroad, over which millions of feet of cut timber were once transported.

   The tiny towns of Victory and Granby, probably best known today for their proximity to the unique natural environment of the Victory Basin Wildlife Management Area, were once the scene of some of the most intense timber harvesting the Green Mountain State has ever witnessed. Although little evidence remains of this unique era in Vermont history, it was not all that long ago that lumberjacks and locomotives ruled the day in the upper reaches of the Moose River valley.

   “As with his many other logging histories, Bill has done a great job bringing to light this amazing period in Vermont and Essex County history,” said publisher Mike Dickerman. “His collection of photos documenting the logging era along the Moose River is second to none and really complements his decades-long research.”

   The Moose River book is the Williamstown, Vermont, author’s latest book covering the logging railroad days of northern New England. Gove has authored four previous logging railroad histories, including J. E. Henry’s Logging Railroads, Logging Railroads of New Hampshire’s North Country, Logging Along the Pemigewasset River, and Logging Railroads of the Saco River Valley. He is also the author of Log Drives on the Connecticut River, Sky Route to the Quarries and Logging Railroads of the Adirondacks.

   Bondcliff Books is an independent book publisher specializing in titles related to New Hampshire, the White Mountains and northern New England. Since its founding in 1996, the Littleton company has published several dozen books, including hiking guides and books on White Mountain logging and railroading history.

   Logging Along the Moose River: the Story of the Victory Branch Railroad, is now available in retail stores across the region. Copies may also be purchased by visiting the Bondcliff Books’ website (www.bondcliffbooks.com), by calling 603-444-4880, or by writing to the publisher at P.O. Box 385, Littleton, NH 03561.